BOSTON (CBS) – Dr. Mallika Marshall is answering your coronavirus-related medical questions.

Dr. Mallika is offering her best advice, but as always, consult your personal doctor before making any decisions about your personal health.

If you cannot get back for your second shot within the suggested time what do you do? Is there some way I do not have to start over? – Ray

Even if your second shot is delayed by several weeks, you do not have to start over. Get your second shot as soon as you can.

My husband and I are in the 65+ age group trying to get the vaccine. Now that restaurants and other venues are opening up with unlimited/limited capacity on March 1st, can we go to these places and not be too concerned about getting covid? – FloJo

I would not change your behavior at all until you are both fully vaccinated. But the vaccines, while highly effective, are not 100% effective so there is still a small chance you could get COVID-19. You’ll have to weigh the risks and benefits of going out and about. I would continue to wear a mask and socially distance wherever possible. Indoor dining is risky because you have to take your mask off for some period of time, so I might think twice about doing that. Dine outdoors whenever possible.

I previously had Guillain Barre Syndrome in 2001. I am afraid to take the Covid-19 vaccine shots. Is it safe for me to receive the shots? – Patricia

According to the CDC, you can receive either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine even if you have had a history of Guillain Barre Syndrome.

If you’ve received 2 doses of the vaccine, do you think it’s safe to go away on vacation? I’m thinking about going to Florida at the end of April, but not 100% sure if it’s the right decision. – Priscilla

You will be considered fully vaccinated once you’re 2 weeks out from your second dose. That said, while highly effective, the vaccines are not 100% effective so there is still a small risk that you could get sick from COVID-19. That’s a risk that you may be willing to take to get away. Just please continue to be careful while you’re traveling. Some states are not as conscientious about mask-wearing and social-distancing. so stay on your guard.

Another viewer asks, “Why isn’t Multiple Sclerosis on the list for underlying health problems for the COVID-19 vaccination?”

Multiple sclerosis alone does not increase the risk of COVID-19 but there are certain people with MS who may be at higher risk depending on their underlying physical condition or what medications they’re taking.