UPDATED: April 25, 2015 4:55 p.m.

BALTIMORE (WNEW/AP) — At least a thousand protesters are marching through the streets of Baltimore and snarling traffic over the death of Freddie Gray – a day after the Baltimore Police Department acknowledged that it failed to get him the medical attention he needed after his arrest.

The racially diverse crowd is filling at least two full city blocks, and waving signs that read, “racism is a disease, revolution is the cure.”

Marchers paused for a moment of silence in front of Shock Trauma, where Freddie Gray died a week ago from a traumatic spine injury he suffered while in police custody.

At the back of the march is a caravan of at least 20 cars blocking the traffic on the periphery of Camden Yards, where the Baltimore Orioles are hosting the Boston Red Sox.

Protesters and the curious are steadily streaming into the plaza directly across from City Hall. Some are wearing shirts that say “black lives matter” and holding signs that state “I’m not a threat” and “Stop killing us” as music and civil rights speeches are played through large speakers.

Demonstrations have been held almost daily this week. Ahead of the rally, protesters vowed to “shut down” the city.

Justice Allah, 30, who is with Black Lawyers for Justice, said the goal of the protest is to call attention to the problem of killings by police officers.

“We’re tired of this, what is going on with this police department,” Allah said. “We’re tired of our mayor turning a blind eye.”

Malik Shabazz of Black Lawyers for Justice has demanded the arrest of six officers involved in the arrest of Gray, who died Sunday a week after suffering a spinal injury while in police custody.

The officers are suspended with pay and under criminal investigation by their own department. The U.S. Justice Department is reviewing the case for any civil rights violations, and Gray’s family is conducting their own probe.

Late Friday, Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis said Gray, 25, should have received medical attention at the spot where he was arrested — before he was put inside a police transport van handcuffed and without a seat belt, a violation of the Police Department’s policy.

Gray, who is black, was arrested April 12 after he made eye contact with officers and ran away, police said. Officers held him down, handcuffed him and loaded him into the van. While inside, he became irate and leg cuffs were put on him, police have said.

Gray asked for medical help several times, beginning before he was placed in the van. After a 30-minute ride that included three stops, paramedics were called.

Authorities have not explained how or when Gray’s spine was injured.

Commissioner Anthony Batts said it was possible Gray was hurt before the van ride or during a “rough ride” — where officers hit the brakes and take sharp turns to injure suspects in the back of vans.

“We know he was not buckled in the transportation wagon as he should have been. There’s no excuse for that, period,” Batts said. “We know our police employees failed to give him medical attention in a timely manner multiple times.”

Earlier Friday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said she has many questions.

“I still want to know why the policies and procedures for transport were not followed,” she said. “I still want to know why none of the officers called for immediate medical assistance despite Mr. Gray’s apparent pleas.

“The one thing we all know is because of this incident a mother has to bury their child and she doesn’t even know exactly how or why this tragedy occurs — only that this occurs while her child was in police custody,” the mayor said. “This is absolutely not acceptable, and I want answers.”

Rawlings-Blake expects the results of the Police Department’s investigation to be turned over to prosecutors in a week, and they will decide whether any criminal charges will be filed or whether to put the case before a grand jury. There is no timetable for when that will happen.

The leader of a group of local ministers called on Batts to resign immediately.

“It seems that no one in the Police Department can explain what happened,” said the Rev. Alvin Gwynn Sr., president of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Baltimore.

He said the Police Department is “in disarray” and Batts has shown a “lack of viable leadership capabilities.”

The mayor appeared to back the police commissioner at her own news conference, and Batts defended his record, saying he was brought on in 2012 to reform the department. Since then, he said he has fired 50 employees and reduced the number of officer-involved shootings and excessive force complaints.

The Rev. Frank Reid of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore, who met with Rawlings-Blake on Friday, said he wants to believe the Police Department’s investigation will be transparent.

“I want to take them at their word, but the purpose of being here today is to not only to let the city know but the Police Department know that we’re going to hold them accountable,” Reid said. “This is not going to go away. … Business as usual is no longer acceptable. This is all too frequent. It’s a historic issue, and we want to stop it now.”

Follow WNEW on Twitter

(© Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Comments

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s