WASHINGTON (CBSDC) — Fans had their first opportunity to say goodbye to the “Godfather of Go-Go” on Tuesday during a public viewing for Chuck Brown at the Howard Theatre.

The viewing will be held from 11 a.m to 10 p.m. No photography of any kind will be allowed inside the theatre.

Some in Brown’s family are just now starting to feel the full impact of his loss given the gravity of occasion.

“It didn’t hit until today,” his Goddaughter told All-News 99.1 WNEW reporter Kevin Rincon. “It’s like you’ve been wanting to believe it’s not real.”

GALLERY: CHUCK BROWN REMEMBERED AT HOWARD THEATRE

The hundreds of fans who have lined up to pay their respect to the legendary musician are able to bring some comfort to his family, knowing he was so cherished. The throng then waited patiently as the family entered the theatre to privately pay their respects before opening the doors to the public.

“We’re holding up,” Brown’s Goddaughter added. “It’s been hard on everybody. . . It was so sudden. Like, pneumonia? Really? That’s what takes him?”

Many used the somber day to remember all that Brown had given to the music scene. His reach extended far beyond the District’s borders and reverberated around the country, continuing to impact the notes flowing from the radio today.

“He sparked and ignited what you hear today,” one fan said. “Other go-go genres, hip hop genres, hip hop as a whole . . . he brought that to life.”

Street Closures

Officials strongly encourage those attending the viewing to use public transportation as parking will be very limited and many streets around the area will be closed.

The Shaw/Howard University Metro Station on the Green Line is the closest stop to the theatre.

T Street will be closed from 7th Street to Florida Avenue.

GALLERY: CHUCK BROWN 1936-2012

Following rush hour, the closures will expand on 7th and 8th streets which will be shut down between Florida Avenue and S Street.

The closures will continue until midnight.

Brown passed away nearly two weeks ago after battling multiple ailments at Johns Hopkins Hospital.