Arts & Culture

Historic Walking Tour of Washington, D.C.

June 9, 2014 8:00 AM

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File photo of tourists walking near the Washington Monument. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

File photo of tourists walking near the Washington Monument. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The minute you step foot into Washington, D.C., you have touched down on history. Almost everywhere you turn is a building or landmark that was the location of some historic event. Tourists and residents flock the city to remember, learn and experience these historic locations. On your next walking tour in Washington, D.C., visit these historic locations.

Ford’s Theatre
511 10th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20004
(202) 347-4833
www.fordstheatre.org

Some people have no idea that President Lincoln was assassinated in Washington, D.C.’s Ford’s Theatre, or that he died just across the street at the Peterson House. Only four exterior walls remain of the original theater, but it still serves as an historical building commemorating that fateful night. With displays of Lincoln’s clothing he wore that night, the bed he died in and more historic items, the theatre is a must see for tourists. It is also a great way to start an historic walking tour of the nation’s capital.

The Willard Hotel
1401 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
Washington, DC 20004
(202) 628-9100
www.intercontinental.com

Consider Washington, D.C.’s first skyscraper. The Willard Hotel holds a lot of significance in the city. For over 150 years, The Willard has been a home away from home for royalty, presidents, famous authors and more including Mark Twain, Charles Dickens and Presidents Lincoln, Fillmore, Taft, Grant and Harding. With books being written there, the hotel being mentioned in literature and a lot of business being done there, The Willard Hotel is historically significant for both DC and the country.

The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W.
Washington, DC 20500
(202) 456-1111
www.whitehouse.gov

When thinking of DC, the White House is probably the first thing you think of, along with politics. The most famous house, and perhaps most secure house in the country, the president and first family call it their home. But not every president has actually lived in the house. The very first president of the United States of America, George Washington, never lived in the house. And only a few presidents lived in the original house. The original house burned down in the War of 1812, and was then rebuilt and painted white. There are many more interesting facts about this presidential home that you will discover on your walking tour.

Related: Best Sightseeing Tours In Washington DC

The National Mall
Washington, DC
(202) 426-6841
www.nps.gov

The National Mall is surrounded by and contains some of DC’s most beloved monuments, memorials, museums and landmarks. On the Mall you will find the Vietnam Memorial, WWII Memorial, Washington Monument, African American Civil War Memorial and Constitution Gardens – and that’s just scratching the surface. It has been featured in several movies and television shows, often as a backdrop for important events. The Mall itself is beautiful and serves as a location for residents and tourists to picnic, play games and more. But it is also a central and important point of a walking tour, as it gives you a chance to reflect before you continue your journey.

Lincoln Memorial
2 Lincoln Memorial Circle N.W.
Washington, DC 20037
(202) 426-6841
www.nps.gov

President Abraham Lincoln is one of the most memorable and recognized U.S. presidents for his appearance, presidency and for his death. Two years after President Lincoln’s assassination, the monument was proposed, but wasn’t opened to the public until 1922. Since then, millions of people have visited the memorial and major historical events have taken place on the steps. The memorial continues to be a legacy of peace, unity and dreams come true.

Related: Best Free Tours In Washington, D.C.

Folashade Oyegbola is a freelance writer covering all things D.C. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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