Food & Drink

Best Sushi In Washington, D.C.

January 25, 2011 6:16 PM

View Comments
Kaz Sushi Bistro

Kaz Sushi Bistro

It’s no secret that our nation’s capital offers some of the most diverse cuisines in the nation. So with all the sushi restaurants, it can be difficult to distinguish the ho-hum from the oh-wow! It takes a lot to stand out among the many restaurants. Use this list to get started on your journey to the best sushi in Washington, D.C. – Allie Moore
Sushi Bar

Getty Images

Sushiko

2309 Wisconsin Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20007
(202) 333-4187

5455 Wisconsin Ave.
Chevy Chase, Md. 20815
(301) 961-1644
www.sushikorestaurants.com

The first sushi bar in Washington, D.C., Sushiko has maintained its popularity among D.C. sushi lovers with its creative menu of nigiri, sushi, sashimi, maki temki, chirashi and other Japanese dishes. The chic and sophisticated interior rings of class and style, which matches the delicate menu and the artistic display of every dish. Although a bit pricey, the quality and freshness of the fish is worth it.

Sushi Taro

1503 17th St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 462-8999
www.sushitaro.com

Proudly serving some dishes in a Kaiseki fashion, an authentic Japanese dining style in which diners are surprised by the chef’s selections rather than choosing from a menu, Sushi Taro has consistently been named among the best sushi in Washington, D.C. Along with its traditional sushi bar and Japanese delights, the varieties of Kaiseki include a tasting menu, seasonal menus and “Suppon Kaiseki,” which includes soft-shell snapping turtle cooked using a traditional Japanese technique.

Kaz Sushi Bistro

1915 I St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
(202) 530-5500
www.kazsushibistro.com

Ever wanted to learn to make your own sushi? Kaz Sushi Bistro gives you the chance by offering sushi-making classes for groups of 10 to 20 people. They also have a rewards program for loyal and frequent customers, allowing members to earn one point for every dollar spent. Chef Kaz uses aged red rice vinegar when making the sushi rice, instead of the standard rice vinegar. This gives the rice a higher amino acid content. The soy sauce is a unique house blend made from ingredients from a micro brewery in Japan. Chef Kaz also uses innovative ingredients in his sushi, such as mango puree and basil sauce, to amp up the flavor.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,729 other followers