Report: $350M ‘Funding Opportunity’ To Provide ‘Family Planning Services’ To Immigrant Children

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A $350 million “funding opportunity” from the Department of Health and Human Services to provide shelter for underage illegal aliens indicates that recipients must provide the children with “family planning services” and added “sensitity” to sexual orientation issues.” (Getty)

A $350 million “funding opportunity” from the Department of Health and Human Services to provide shelter for underage illegal aliens indicates that recipients must provide the children with “family planning services” and added “sensitity” to sexual orientation issues.” (Getty)

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WASHINGTON (CBS DC/AP) – A $350 million “funding opportunity” from the Department of Health and Human Services to provide shelter for underage illegal aliens indicates that recipients must provide the children with “family planning services” and added “sensitivity” to sexual orientation issues.”

“Residential care providers are required to provide or arrange for the program required services in a manner that is sensitive to the age, culture, religion, dietary needs, native language, sexual orientation, gender identity, and other important individual needs of each UAC [Unaccompanied Alien Children],” reads the grant announcement obtained by CNSNews.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement [ORR/DCS] program uses the 2002 Homeland Security Act’s definition of UAC minors as “those who have no lawful immigration status in the United States; Who have not attained 18 years of age; AND For whom there is no parent or legal guardian in the United States; OR no parent or legal guardian in the United States is available to provide care and physical custody.”

“Residential care providers are required to provide…family planning services,” adds the grant specifications. “While the UAC population generally consists of adolescents 12 to 17 years of age with males representing a higher percentage of the overall population, ORR is looking for applicants who can provide services for a diverse population of UAC of all ages and genders as well as pregnant and parenting teens.”

The UAC are required to receive a complete medical examination that includes screening for infectious diseases within 48 hours of admission. They also receive “appropriate immunizations,” emergency health care services, “family planning services,” other routine dental and medical care, prescription drugs, specific dietary requirements and mental health intervention.

The grant continues: “shelter care services begin once ORR accepts a UAC for placement and ends when the minor is released from ORR custody, turns 18 years of age, or the minor’s immigration case results in a final disposition of removal from the United States.”

A March Health and Human Services budget proposal included estimates that 60,000 UAC’s will be apprehended entering the U.S. in 2014 – and 815 percent increase from the 6,560 young illegals caught in 2011.

Arizona politicians have criticized the transfer of hundreds of migrant children to a state known for its immigration problem. But the mayor of a border town where the kids are being held in a former warehouse said Monday that the conditions of their temporary housing were good enough.

Nogales Mayor Arturo Garino toured the massive facility Monday where state officials say about 700 to 1,000 mostly Central American children were sent after they were caught crossing into Texas.

The children are mostly on their own, complicating the influx of migrants last month to the Rio Grande Valley in Texas that overwhelmed the Border Patrol there. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security started flying immigrants to Arizona, where they were released and told to report to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement office near where they were traveling within 15 days.

Mexican immigrants caught crossing the border are usually deported immediately, but it is more difficult to deport migrants from Central American countries, especially if they are minors.

Immigration advocates have warned for months that they expect tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors to cross the border this year.

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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