Obama: Gitmo Detainees Exchanged For Bergdahl Could Return To Terrorism

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President Barack Obama makes a statement about the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl as his parents, Jani Bergdahl and Bob Bergdahl listen May 31, 2014 in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, D.C. (credit: J.H. Owen-Pool/Getty Images)

President Barack Obama makes a statement about the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl as his parents, Jani Bergdahl and Bob Bergdahl listen May 31, 2014 in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, D.C. (credit: J.H. Owen-Pool/Getty Images)

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WARSAW, Poland (CBSDC/AP) — President Barack Obama said during a news conference in Poland Tuesday that five released Guantanamo Bay detainees could return to terrorism.

Despite the potential threat, Obama said that the five high-level Taliban members do not pose a national security threat and that the U.S. “will be in a position “ to go after them if they do become a threat to Americans.

Obama also defended his decision to exchange the detainees for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was captured in June 2009 after wandering off his base in Afghanistan and held for nearly five years.

“Regardless of the circumstances, whatever those circumstances may turn out to be, we still get an American soldier back if he’s held in captivity,” Obama said. “We don’t condition that.”

The Pentagon concluded in 2010 that Bergdahl walked away from his unit, and after an initial flurry of searching the military curbed any high-risk rescue plans.

A Pentagon official told CBS News that Bergdahl was “at worst, a deserter. At best, a stupid kid who caused us to expend great energy and resources to bring him home.”

Bergdahl was in stable condition Monday at a U.S. military hospital in Germany, but questions mounted at home over the way his freedom was secured: Five high-level members of the Taliban were released from the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and sent to Qatar. The five, who will have to stay in Qatar for a year before going back to Afghanistan, include former ministers in the Taliban government, commanders and one man who had direct ties to the late al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden.

A U.S. defense official familiar with efforts to free Bergdahl said the U.S. government had been working in recent months to split the Taliban network. Different U.S. agencies had floated several offers to the militants, and the Taliban leadership feared that underlings might cut a quick deal while they were working to free the five detainees at Guantanamo, said the official and a congressional aide, both of whom spoke only on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about efforts to release Bergdahl.

There was plenty of criticism about how the deal came about.

“Knowing that various lines of effort were presented and still under consideration, none of which involved a disproportionate prisoner exchange, I am concerned by the sudden urgency behind the prisoner swap, given other lines of effort,” said Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., who has criticized the government effort to seek Bergdahl’s release as disorganized.

One current and one former U.S. official said Obama had signed off on a possible prisoner swap. The president spoke to the Qatari emir last Tuesday, and they gave each other assurances about the proposed transfers, said a senior administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity because the official wasn’t authorized to discuss the deliberations in public.

Bergdahl’s handoff to U.S. special forces in eastern Afghanistan was never going to lead to an uncomplicated yellow-ribbon celebration. The exchange stirred debate over a possibly heightened risk other Americans being snatched as bargaining chips and whether the released detainees would find their way back to the battlefield.

Republicans in Congress criticized the agreement and complained about not having been consulted, citing a law that requires Congress to be given 30 days notice before a prisoner is released from Guantanamo.

Republicans on the House Armed Services Committee said the Pentagon notified the panel by phone on Saturday that the exchange was occurring in the next five hours.

“A phone call does not meet the legal standard of congressional notification,” the Republican members said in a statement and added that official notice of the move came Monday, “more than 72 hours after the detainees were released.”

Republicans also argued that the swap could set a dangerous precedent.

“The five terrorists released were the hardest of the hard-core,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican. “I fear President Obama’s decision will inevitably lead to more Americans being kidnapped and held hostage throughout the world.”

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, who was campaigning Monday for U.S. Senate candidate Joni Ernst in suburban Des Moines, said the hostage exchange was evidence of what he called a weak and dangerous Obama foreign policy.

“We have released five very dangerous individuals who eventually will find their way back into the battlefield,” Rubio told reporters, referring to the swap as setting a price on for American soldiers. “I think it sets a very dangerous precedent.”

White House chief of staff Denis McDonough pushed back.

“All Americans should know that we did what was necessary to get Bowe back,” he said in a speech to a think tank. “We did not have 30 days to wait to get this done. And when you’re commander in chief, you have to act when there is an opportunity for action.”

U.S. officials said they had to act quickly because Bergdahl’s health and safety appeared in jeopardy, but declined to explain how.

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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