Quick Fix Diets Often Lead to Long Term Obesity

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credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Chuck Carroll, All News 99.1 WNEW (Credit: CBSDC.com) Chuck Carroll
Chuck Carroll currently serves as a contributor for CBSDC.com. H...
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Yo-Yo Dieting and Healthy Fats | Kay Loughrey

All News 99.1 WNEW

Quick fix diets are often like putting a band-aid on a cut that requires stitches. It may work for a time, but eventually you’ll be back to square one and with a big mess on your hands.

If you’re battling the bulge, it’s critical to resist the temptation to shed as many pounds as possible in just a matter of days. Often times those who choose that accelerated route find they’ll put all the weight back on and then some over time.

For many, the derailment of their weight loss conquest begins before they even begin the diet.

How many times have you began a diet by thinking about the big steak or ice cream you’ll eat as soon as the diet is over? That’s the first step in yo-yo dieting.

What’s worse? Putting the weight back on is just one more concern in a sea of doubt that makes the whole idea of losing weight so overwhelming that some can’t even stomach the idea of such an ordeal. So, they throw in the towel before the fight has even begun.

But there are small changes that a person can make to make the seemingly infinite struggle seem much more manageable.

“If you can just make changes that you can live with over the years, it’s going to be a lot easier and it’s going to last a lot longer,” Sweet Life nutritionist and behavioral coach Kay Loughrey said.

The biggest “small step” a person can make is to take time for themselves to manage stress each day. Even if it’s just 15 minutes, the ‘me time’ can pay huge dividends.

As emotional eaters, stress can be a huge trigger for food. Taking time to cope with the struggles of the day can greatly help squash that crutch.

“That’s the number one thing my clients tell me,” Loughrey said. “They’re just so stressed out they can’t focus on the small changes.”

Contact Kay

@KayLoughrey
Sweet Life Nutritionist and Behavioral Coach
SweetLifeWellness.com

About The Author

Standing just 5 feet 6 inches tall, Chuck Carroll once weighed 420 pounds and amassed a 66-inch waist. He shed 260 pounds to become The Weight Loss Champion and now serves as an advocate for healthy living.

Follow him on Twitter @TheChuckCarroll

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