Pat Sajak: Global Warming Alarmists Are ‘Unpatriotic Racists’

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File photo of Pat Sajak, Wheel of Fortune host.   (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images for PLAYERS INC)

File photo of Pat Sajak, Wheel of Fortune host. (Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images for PLAYERS INC)

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WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) – Game show host Pat Sajak came under fire for tweeting that global warming alarmists are “unpatriotic racists.”

Sajak, who has hosted Wheel of Fortune for decades, received hundreds of responses for the tweet he sent out below:

It wasn’t clear what he meant by “racist,” but Sajak evoked a response from climate scientist Michael E Mann.

Sajak followed up  by trying to explain on Twitter his original tweet with this tweet below:

Sajak’s tweet came after a recent report emphasized how serious the world should take the environmental issue.

Climate change’s assorted harms “are expected to become increasingly disruptive across the nation throughout this century and beyond,” the National Climate Assessment concluded. The report emphasizes how warming and its all-too-wild weather are changing daily lives, even using the phrase “climate disruption” as another way of saying global warming.

Still, it’s not too late to prevent the worst of climate change, says the 840-page report, which the White House is highlighting as it tries to jump-start often stalled efforts to curb heat-trapping gases.

White House counselor John Podesta said that the climate change report gives “a huge amount of practical, usable knowledge that state and local decision-makers can take advantage of as they plan on or for the impacts of climate change and work to make their communities more resilient.”

However, if the nation and the world don’t change the way they use energy, “we’re still on the pathway to more damage and danger of the type that are described in great detail in the rest of this report,” said study co-author Henry Jacoby, co-director of the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jacoby, other scientists and White House officials said this is the most detailed and U.S.-focused scientific report on global warming.

“Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present,” the report says.

“Corn producers in Iowa, oyster growers in Washington state and maple syrup producers in Vermont are all observing climate-related changes that are outside of recent experience.”

The report looks at regional and state-level effects of global warming, compared with recent reports from the United Nations that lumped all of North America together. A draft of the report was released in January 2013, but this version has been reviewed by more scientists, the National Academy of Science and 13 government agencies and had public comment. It is written in a bit more simple language so people could realize “that there’s a new source of risk in their lives,” said study lead author Gary Yohe of Wesleyan University in Connecticut.

Even though the nation’s average temperature has risen by as much as 1.9 degrees since record keeping began in 1895, it’s in the big, wild weather where the average person feels climate change the most, said co-author Katharine Hayhoe, a Texas Tech University climate scientist. Extreme weather like droughts, storms and heat waves hit us in the pocketbooks and can be seen by our own eyes, she said.

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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