Record Rainfall Floods D.C.-Baltimore Region

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WASHINGTON (WNEW/AP) — Record-breaking rainfall overflowed creeks and streams, causing flooding throughout the Baltimore-Washington region.

Heavy rains slowed overnight, but officials warned motorists on Thursday to keep watching for flooded roads. Downed trees on overhead lines interrupted MARC Penn line service.

The National Weather Service says Dulles International and Reagan National airports broke 2005 rainfall records on Wednesday. Dulles got 3.99 inches and Reagan received 2.7 inches. Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport tied a 1947 record of 3.06 inches.

Meteorologist Carl Barnes says there are still flood warnings in the region as tributaries drain into larger rivers like the Potomac and flooding could be an issue into Friday.

Hundreds of people were evacuated from areas of Laurel after a release of water from two dams in the area flooded parts of the city.

In Baltimore, a block-long section of a residential street collapsed during heavy rains Wednesday afternoon, sending cars sliding down a steep embankment onto railroad tracks and forcing the evacuation of several houses.

Officials say the heavy rains also have caused sewage overflows in the Washington area.

The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission says the sewage overflows happened at two of its facilities in Prince George’s County. The first one happened Wednesday evening at the Fort Washington Forest Wastewater Pumping Station on Monroe Avenue in Fort Washington.

The second overflow happened at the Broad Creek Wastewater Pumping Station, also in Fort Washington, which began overflowing a short time later. Officials say the drinking water system is not affected by the overflows.

National Park Service officials also say a sewage spill has closed a stretch of the Capital Crescent Trail in Washington. The trail is closed between Fletcher’s Cove and the trail’s end at Water Street in Georgetown until further notice.

Barnes says there’s not much substantial rain in the forecast in the coming week, so the region may have a chance to dry out.

(TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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