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Poll: 61 Percent of Americans Believe Oswald Did Not Act Alone in JFK’s Death

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File photo of the eternal flame that burns near the final resting place of John F. Kennedy. (Photo by Alex Wong, Getty Images)

File photo of the eternal flame that burns near the final resting place of John F. Kennedy. (Photo by Alex Wong, Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON (CBSDC) — A recent Gallup poll shows that more than half of all Americans still believe that Lee Harvey Oswald did not act alone when he took the life of former President John F. Kennedy.

A reported 61 percent of people still maintain the belief that others were involved, a release on the poll’s findings shows.

However, while the latest poll indicates a majority of people in the United States are holding firm to such a belief, it is the smallest majority documented in the past 50 years.

“Could one man have fired three shots and killed Kennedy in a way consistent with his wounds? If Oswald actually acted alone at the Texas School Book Depository, was he funded or supported by others? These are some of the questions that have burned in the American psyche since that fateful day in 1963,” those involved in polling on the matter noted.

Gallup added, “Speculating about who was really responsible for Kennedy’s death will likely remain a topic of fascination for the American public for many years to come.”

Skepticism regarding the events of Nov. 22, 1963 reached their highest – 81 percent – at two different points in the last half century. First, in the late 1970s, and again just after the turn of the century.

When asked, respondents in the most recent poll offered multiple possibilities for possible culprits in the assassination.

“Gallup … asked those who believe the Kennedy assassination was part of a conspiracy an open-ended question about who, besides Oswald, they thought was involved,” the release noted. “Americans cite the Mafia (13 percent) and the federal government (13 percent) most often, followed by the CIA (7 percent), Fidel Castro or Cuba (5 percent), and unnamed ‘special interests who disagreed with [Kennedy's] policies’ (5 percent).”

Researchers added, “Forty percent of Americans, however, could not offer the name of a person or group involved in a conspiracy.”

The release states that the poll, conducted between Nov. 7 and Nov. 10 of this year, involved 1,039 American adults selected at random.

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