New CDC Lyme Disease Estimate: 300,000 Cases Per Year

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An adult female and nymph tick. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

An adult female and nymph tick. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

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ATLANTA (CBSDC/AP) — Lyme disease is about 10 times more common than previously reported, health officials said Monday.

As many as 300,000 Americans are actually diagnosed with Lyme disease each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced.

Usually, only 20,000 to 30,000 illnesses are reported each year. For many years, CDC officials have known that many doctors don’t report every case and that the true count was probably much higher.

The new figure is the CDC’s most comprehensive attempt at a better estimate. The number comes from a survey of seven national laboratories, a national patient survey and a review of insurance information.

“It’s giving us a fuller picture and it’s not a pleasing one,” said Dr. Paul Mead, who oversees the agency’s tracking of Lyme disease.

The ailment is named after Lyme, Conn., where the illness was first identified in 1975. It’s a bacteria transmitted through the bites of infected deer ticks, which can be about the size of a poppy seed.

Symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic bull’s-eye shaped skin rash. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart and the nervous system.

Many untreated patients suffer from intermittent bouts of arthritis, with severe joint pain and swelling. Some even develop chronic neurological complaints months and years after being infected, including shooting pains, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet and problems with short-term memory.

In the U.S., the majority of Lyme disease reports have come from 13 states: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin.

The new study did not find anything to suggest the disease is more geographically widespread, Mead said.

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(TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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