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Study: Some Beers, Liquors More Likely To Land Consumers in ER

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Budweiser beer can (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Budweiser beer can (credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Courtney Pomeroy, All News 99.1 WNEW (Credit: CBSDC.com) Courtney Pomeroy
Courtney Pomeroy works as a Web Content Editor at All-News 99.1 WNE...
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LANHAM, Md. (CBSDC) — Some beers and liquors are more likely to land you in the emergency room than others, according to a study conducted at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Recent research shows that “nearly a third of injury visits to Level I trauma centers were alcohol-related and frequently a result of heavy drinking,” according to David Jernigan, director of The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

And understanding the relationship between certain types of alcohol and the injuries sustained by those who drink them could guide lawmakers to “considering taxation and physical availability of different types of alcohol,” he said.

Budweiser, Steel Reserve, Colt 45, Bud Ice and Bud Light were the beer brands consumed in the highest quantities by ER patients that visited the East Baltimore emergency room on Friday and Saturday nights between April 2010 and June 2011.

And four types of malt liquors – Steel Reserve, Colt 45, Bud Ice and King Cobra – accounted for 46 percent of the beer consumed by those questioned.

Researchers also compared the ER patients’ consumption of alcohol by type to the popularity of that particular type of liquor, beer or malt beverage in the U.S. market as a whole. The study found that the proportion of vodka, gin, brandy/cognac and ‘ready-to-drink’ beverages were over-represented compared to their market share in the national market.

Authors of the study say the next step in this type of research would be interviewing patients across multiple cities and hospitals.

Policy changes resulting from an expanded study could include changes in alcohol container labeling, limits on malt liquor availability and marketing and the graduated taxation of alcoholic beverages based on their alcohol content, according to a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health news release.

The release also states that the study is the first of its kind to assess alcohol consumption by brand and type from ER patients.

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