Study: Breastfeeding Could Lower Alzheimer’s Risk In Women

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File photo of newborn children in a nursery. (Photo by DESHAKALYAN CHOWDHURY/AFP/Getty Images)

The financial crisis that followed the collapse of U.S. investment bank Lehman Brothers in 2008 did more than wipe out billions in wealth and millions of jobs. It also sent birth rates tumbling around the world as couples found themselves too short of money or too fearful about their finances to have children. Six years later, birth rates haven’t bounced back. (Photo by DESHAKALYAN CHOWDHURY/AFP/Getty Images)

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BETHESDA, Md. (CBSDC) – Researchers have found that breastfeeding may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease in women, a new study states.

In all, 81 women took part in the ground-breaking study, according to Nature World News. Within that pool of participants, researchers based at the University of Cambridge noticed a relationship between breastfeeding and Alzheimer’s, specifically in regards to a lowering of risks.

Researchers were quoted as saying that the connection was “so strong that any potential sampling error was unlikely.”

Those involved with the study did note that women with predispositions to Alzheimer’s due to family histories may not reap the same benefits from breastfeeding as women without such genetic risk factors.

The National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Md. describes Alzheimer’s as “the most common cause of dementia in adults.”

“Dementia is a loss of memory and intellect that interferes with daily life and activities,” the Institute further explains on its official website. “Dementia is not a disease; rather, it is a group of symptoms that may accompany certain diseases and conditions.”

According to a news release obtained by Nature World News, the study’s lead author – Dr. Molly Fox of the Department of Biological Anthropology at the University – termed research in this vein as “vital.”

She noted, “In the future, we expect it to spread most in low and middle-income countries. So it is vital that we develop low-cost, large-scale strategies to protect people against this devastating disease.”

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