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Crowds Line Up to Experience ‘Corpse Flower’ in D.C.

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The Titan Arum flower. (Credit: Karen Adams/All-News 99.1 WNEW)

The Titan Arum flower. (Credit: Karen Adams/All-News 99.1 WNEW)

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WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) — Curious crowds are experiencing the fleeting bloom of the unusual “corpse flower.”

The 8-foot flower bloomed Sunday at the U.S. Botanic Garden next to the Capitol. But by the time visitors lined up Monday morning, Plant Curator Bill McLaughlin says the “incredible stench” of rotting flesh the flower is famous for had cleared out. The plant is native to the tropical rainforests of Sumatra, Indonesia.

Experts had been anticipating the bloom for more than a week, and it is now expected to collapse on itself. The garden’s last corpse flower bloom was in 2007.

Gene Granados heard about the bloom on the news while on a family trip to Washington. While he expected it to be smellier, he says it was still worth visiting.

It was first discovered in 1878. Corpse flowers also have recently bloomed at facilities in Ohio and in Belgium.

Scientists say the flower’s strange odor serves to attract beetles or other insects that are normally drawn to rotting flesh.

“Just in the same way that a lovely smelling plant, like a rose, is attracting a bee or another kind of insect with what we would consider a very nice smell, to pollinate it, this particular plant has the strategy of using a horrible, fetid smell to attract insects,” said Ari Novy, the public programs manager at the garden. “So this plant is essentially tricking those kinds of insects into coming, having a party inside of the plant and the flower and pollinating it and then moving on.”

The titan arum growing at the U.S. Botanic Garden is about 10 years old, and this is its first flower. It began with a seed the size of a lima bean and has grown several feet tall. The plants bloom on irregular, unpredictable schedules, Novy said. A hot, humid climate provides the ideal conditions for the plant to produce a flower.

Besides drawing beetles, the titan arum has proven to be a big draw for visitors.

“Over the last many years, this plant has proven to be the biggest attractor, not only of carrion beetles but of human beings that we’ve had,” Novy said. “It’s just got everything for a good mystery. It’s cryptic. It’s exotic. The timing is off. It’s inconsistent. It’s inconsiderate. It’s got all those great things. It’s from far away, and it smells bad, and people get interested.”

WNEW’s Karen Adams contributed to this report. Follow her and WNEW on Twitter.

(© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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