Food Truck Climate Warms Up in Arlington

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A customer purchases lunch from one of the hundreds of vending trucks that set up shop along the streets of Washington, DC. (Photo credit: PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

A customer purchases lunch from one of the hundreds of vending trucks that set up shop along the streets of Washington, DC. (Photo credit: PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

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ARLINGTON, Va. — Food trucks in Arlington will have a whole two hours to sell their goodies now, as the county board unanimously approved doubling the previous one-hour parking limit Tuesday.

By 3 p.m., the lunch rush might be over on Wilson Boulevard but there are still plenty of people interested in making a quick run for a curbside cupcake. Now that he’s got an extra hour to work with, Brandon Lawson tells WNEW’s George Mesthos that he can keep his pink truck on the curb and scoop up the snackers and stragglers.

“That little bit of time can make the difference,” he said.

But brick and mortar businesses still aren’t thrilled that the food trucks can cut off the path to their doors.

RELATED — Food Truck Association: DC Trucks in Jeopardy

“You know, you walk down from the Rosslyn Metro and there’s five food trucks serving breakfast,” said Spencer Lacey, general manager of Brown Bag Rosslyn. But his restaurant is fighting fire with fire.

“We just started our food trucks about two months ago… trying to capture some of that business that all these trucks are seeing.”

Lawson says the changes in Arlington are a good start, but he and other food truckers are worried about changes the District is considering.

If Mayor Vincent Gray’s latest proposed “Mobile Roadway Vending” regulations are enacted, trucks would become illegal in most of downtown D.C., representatives of the DC Food Truck Association said in March.

“They’re trying to force it so that we’re not close to certain restaurants all around D.C., and a lot of hot spots where we do sell at, there’s restaurants there already,” Lawson said. “So, it’s making it very difficult… it’s a real big, big issue.”

WNEW’s George Mesthos contributed to this report. Follow him and WNEW on Twitter.

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