106.7 The Fan All News 99.1 WNEW CBS Sports Radio 1580

Hagel: Boston Marathon Bombing ‘Cruel Act of Terror’

View Comments
Police officers stand near the Boston Marathon finish line from Clarendon and Boylston Street on April 16, 2013 in Boston, Mass. (credit: Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Police officers stand near the Boston Marathon finish line from Clarendon and Boylston Street on April 16, 2013 in Boston, Mass. (credit: Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Latest News

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) — Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Tuesday that the deadly twin bombings at the Boston Marathon finish line was a “cruel act of terror” and vowed that those who are responsible will be brought to justice.

Testifying on Capitol Hill, Hagel was the first Obama administration official to reference terror or terrorism after the bombings Monday killed three and wounded more than 170 people Monday afternoon.

President Barack Obama, in his own brief statement at the White House late Monday, made no mention of terrorists or terrorism as a possible cause of the bombings. A White House official speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still unfolding did say the attack was being treated as an act of terrorism.

Hagel said any event in which explosive devices are used is clearly an act of terror.

“As the president said yesterday, we still do not know who did this and why, and a thorough investigation will have to determine whether it was planned or carried out by a terror group, foreign or domestic,” Hagel told the House Appropriations defense subcommittee. “It’s important not to jump to conclusions before we have all the facts, but as the White House said last night, ‘Any event with multiple explosive devices, as this appears to be, is clearly an act of terror and will be approached as an act of terror.'”

He mentioned the Pentagon’s connection to the race, with many in the defense community participating in the race and commended the quick work of the Massachusetts National Guard to assist after the explosions.

Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, also praised the National Guard. Dempsey was testifying with Hagel.

Hagel said the thoughts and prayers of those at the Pentagon are with the people of Boston.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, also referenced terrorism.

“You can describe it in a lot of different ways, but it was a terrorist attack of some sort. … There’s just not enough information at this time,” Boehner told reporters Tuesday at a news conference.

“We just don’t know enough about it, but I have no doubt that we will. … The president and I had this conversation last evening. He’d like to know more, I’d like to know more. The American people would like to know more. Unfortunately we don’t, but I am confident that we are going to get to the bottom of this.”

At the House hearing, Rep. C.W. Bill Young, R-Fla., pressed Hagel about Pentagon plans to disband one of the civil support teams that responded to the attack in Boston. Young said Congress was notified in a March 29 letter that the two teams, one based in New York, the other in Florida, would be disestablished.

Hagel insisted that the teams would remain and said the budget proposal that the administration submitted last week included money for the teams.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced at a press conference Tuesday that no unexploded bombs were found at the Boston Marathon. He says the only explosives were the ones that went off Monday.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 150 injured by two explosions just seconds apart near the finish line Monday.

“Everyone should expect a heightened police presence,” Patrick said.

Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers says there are no known additional threats and agents are following a number of leads.

“Our mission is clear: to bring those to justice those responsible for the Marathon bombings,” DesLauriers said.

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino also called the act “terrorism.”

“This is a bad day for Boston but if we pull together we will get through it,” Menino said. “Boston will overcome.”

Law enforcement officials are calling on the public to provide them with any pictures or video they may have taken during the Boston Marathon in hopes it leads to those responsible.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,597 other followers