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Free Movie Weekend Offers Non-Jurassic Classics

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LANHAM, Md. (CBSDC) - A remake of The Evil Dead and a 3D re-release of Jurassic Park are sure to dominate the box office this weekend. But you don’t have to pay normal ticket prices to take in a classic motion picture this week.

Much like the cherry blossoms, DC’s free movie-viewing season is hitting a peak bloom.

The National Gallery of Art is introducing a month-long series in celebration of Universal Pictures’ 100th anniversary. It kicks off with five movies just this weekend.

Plus there are films featuring classic leading men, campy horror flicks and tense foreign thrillers. Something for everyone.

Here’s the full list for the week starting April 6th:

Saturday:

  • 12pm: a triple-feature of horror classics in celebration of Universal Pictures’ 100th anniversary. The Mummy (1932), with Boris Karloff in the title role, is followed by Murders in the Rue Morgue (1932), starring Bela Lugosi as a crazed scientist who injects unsuspecting young women with ape blood. Then at 2:30, the two horror stars are together in The Black Cat (1934), based on a story by Edgar Allan Poe about a Satan-worshipping priest who traps a honeymooning couple in his home. At the National Gallery of Art’s East Building Concourse, 4th St. & Constitution Ave. NW.
  • 2pm: Shall We Dance? (1996). A repressed accountant comes out of his shell when he takes dancing lessons, a taboo obsession in Japan. Part of the foreign film series at the Chevy Chase Library, 8005 Connecticut Ave., Chevy Chase, Md.
  • 4pm: five short films made over the past four decades will be screened as part of the series “L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema” at the National Gallery of Art’s East Building Concourse, 4th St. & Constitution Ave. NW.
  • 7pm: The weekly screening of a “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” episode at the Black Cat. This week, it’s “Tabula Rasa”, from season 6. 1811 14th St. NW.
  • 7:30pm: 20,000 Years in Sing Sing (1932) stars Spencer Tracy as a man who takes a murder rap at New York’s maximum security prison to protect his girlfriend’s honor. Part of the series “Nothing to Fear, but Fear Itself” at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va.

Sunday:

  • 2pm: Master Builders, a documentary about African-American contributions to DC architecture. At the Anacostia Community Museum, 1901 Fort Pl. SE.
  • 4pm: A double-feature from the silent film era about issues that still resonate today. Traffic in Souls (1913) is based on a real government report at the time about teenage prostitution. Where Are My Children? (1916) touches on birth control and backalley abortions. Pianist Andrew Simpson provides a live soundtrack at the National Gallery of Art’s East Building Concourse, 4th St. & Constitution Ave. NW.

Monday:

  • 6pm: The Heiress (1949) stars Montgomery Clift as a man who proposes marriage to a plain woman who’s set to inherit a large fortune. Part of the series “Montgomery Clift: American Enigma” at the National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
  • 8pm: Dark Heritage (1989). Campers in the woods. Satanic serial killers. An abandoned mansion. What could possibly go wrong? Hosted by the Washington Psychotronic Films Society at McFadden’s, 2401 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.

Tuesday:

  • 12pm: “Secret of the Viking Sword” (2012), a PBS NOVA episode that shows a swordsmith reverse-engineering a Viking’s blade. Part of the Tuesdays at Noon series at the National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th St. NW.
  • 7pm: Rubber Soldiers (2010), a documentary about the 55,000 Brazilian men who moved to the Amazon to harvest rubber during World War II for little pay and no glory. A $10 donation is requested to benefit BloomBars, 3222 11st St. NW. RSVP here.

Thursday:

  • 7:30pm: Love in the Afternoon (1957) stars Gary Cooper as a middle-aged playboy in Paris and Audrey Hepburn as a private detective’s daughter who goes undercover to protect him when his life is threatened. Part of the “April in Paris” series at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va.
  • 8pm: Almayer’s Folly (2012). A French merchant’s dreams of riches for his daughter collapse under the weight of his own greed and prejudice. Playing at the Hirshhorn Museum’s Ring Auditorium, 7th St. and Independence Ave. SW.

Friday:

  • 12pm: a collection of documentary shorts from the 1970s, including the anti-drug film “Curious Alice” and the U.S. Forest Service short “We Belong to the Land,” will be screened at the National Archives’ William G. McGowan Theater, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave., NW.
  • 7pm: a selection of shorts from the Experimental Film and Video Festival in Seoul will be screened as part of the Korean Film Festival at the Freer Gallery’s Meyer Auditorium, 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
  • 7pm: The weekly screening of a “Doctor Who” episode at the Black Cat. Tonight, it’s “Blink”, from season 3. 1811 14th St. NW.
  • 7:30pm: Diva (1981), a French thriller that winds the story of an opera star and her young fan together with a mobster involved in a global drug and prostitution ring. Part of the “April in Paris” series at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va.
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