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Survey: One-Third Of US Adults Abandon News Outlets Citing Lack Of Information

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Nearly one-third of U.S. adults said they have deserted a specific news outlet because it no longer provides the news and information they want. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Nearly one-third of U.S. adults said they have deserted a specific news outlet because it no longer provides the news and information they want. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON (CBS DC) – Nearly one-third of U.S. adults said they have deserted a specific news outlet because it no longer provides the news and information they want.

A Pew Research Center survey of more than 2,000 U.S. adults found that 31 percent had abandoned a news outlet they were accustomed to because the quality and completeness of reporting had declined. When asked which they noticed more, fewer stories or less complete stories, far more people said the latter (24 percent to 61 percent).

Much of the disconnect between news outlets and consumers is tied to media financial struggles. While a majority of those surveyed don’t sense a connection between the news media’s financial strains and quality reporting, a significant minority do detect a direct connection between the two.

Fifty-seven percent of the respondents who had heard at least a little about the financial struggles said they didn’t think the situation had much of an impact on the media’s ability to cover local, national or international news.

People who said they had given up on a news outlet were more likely to be men than women, older than younger, richer than poorer and Republican or independent rather than Democratic. While about one-third of Republicans and independents stopped turning to a news outlet, just one-quarter of Democrats did.

Despite the audience recoil, the majority of people surveyed early this year had heard little or nothing about the financial problems besetting news organizations. The largest group of respondents—36 percent—said they heard “nothing at all” about the issue and the second largest—24 percent—said they heard “a little.”

That combined total of 60 percent far overshadows the 39 percent of people who said they heard “a lot” (17 percent) or “some” (22 percent) about the financial woes of the news industry.

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