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Free Movie Weekend: Bette Davis Eyes

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(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

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Fans of classic films are in luck this week. One of the earliest examples of an epic, a mini-marathon of Bette Davis motion pictures, and a Woody Allen double-feature are among the highlights of a packed week of free movies in and around DC.

Plus, the Environmental Film Festival of the Nation’s Capital begins this Tuesday, the 2013 Korean Film Festival continues at the Freer Gallery, and who can resist a B movie about a karate-chopping cat from outer space?

Here’s the full list of free movies for the week starting March 9th:

Saturday:

  • 1pm: Now, Voyager (1942), starring Bette Davis as a spinster, abused by her mother, who blossoms in therapy and embarks on a love affair with a man in an unhappy marriage. Part of the Classic Film Festival at the National Museum of American History’s Warner Bros. Theater, 1400 Constitution Ave. NW.
  • 3pm: Intolerance (1916), the D.W. Griffith masterpiece starring Lillian Gish in an epic study of intolerance through the ages. With live music from Baltimore’s Boister. Part of the series “The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia: A New Beginning” at the Freer Gallery’s Meyer Auditorium, 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
  • 6pm: Mr. Skeffington (1944), starring Bette Davis as an attractive socialite who marries a stockbroker she doesn’t love (Claude Rains) so that her brother won’t be charged with embezzlement. Part of the Classic Film Festival at the National Museum of American History’s Warner Bros. Theater, 1400 Constitution Ave. NW.
  • 7:30pm: Good Night, and Good Luck (2005). Directed by George Clooney and starring David Strathairn as legendary CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow, taking on Joe McCarthy at the height of the Red Scare. Part of the “Modern Monochrome” series at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va.

Sunday:

  • 1pm: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962). Starring Bette Davis as a troubled child star who torments her crippled sister (Joan Crawford) in their decaying Hollywood mansion. Part of the Classic Film Festival at the National Museum of American History’s Warner Bros. Theater, 1400 Constitution Ave. NW.
  • 1pm: In Another Country (2012). Starring French actress Isabelle Huppert as three different women vacationing in the resort town of Mohan, South Korea. Part of the 2013 Korean Film Festival at the Freer Gallery’s Meyer Auditorium, 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
  • 4:30pm: Bush Mama (1975), a gritty drama about a pregnant woman on welfare in Watts. Part of the series “L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema” at the National Gallery of Art’s East Building Concourse, 4th St. & Constitution Ave. NW.

Monday:

  • 8pm: The Cat (1992), a Hong Kong winner about a kung-fu fighting cat from outer space enlisted to battle an alien invader to Earth. Part of the Washington Psychotropic Film Society’s “Meow Mix” month at McFadden’s, 2401 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.

Tuesday:

  • 12pm: The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital begins with Spoil (2011), a short documentary about the Great Bear rain forest in Canada. The festival runs through March 24th. A full list of films, all free, is here.
  • 7pm: Batuque: The Soul of a People (2005), a short documentary about the native dance of Cape Verde, banned during the time of colonization. Followed by a Q&A via Skype with director Julio Silvão Tavares. A $10 donation is requested to support Bloombars, where the film will be screened. 3222 11st St. NW. RSVP here.

Thursday:

  • 7:30pm: Coup de grâce (1976), a tale of unrequited love during the Soviet civil war. Part of the “Modern Monochrome” series at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va.

Friday:

  • 7pm: Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance (2002). The first film in director Park Chan-wook’s Vengeance Trilogy, one film scholar calls it “one of the most frightening and disturbing films ever made in Korea.” It follows a man who kidnaps the daughter of an organ trafficking ring’s kingpin, after he cheats him out of a kidney. Part of the 2013 Korean Film Festival at the Freer Gallery’s Meyer Auditorium, 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
  • 7:30pm: A Woody Allen double-feature. Broadway Danny Rose (1984) is followed by Stardust Memories (1980). Part of the “Modern Monochrome” series at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater, 19053 Mount Pony Rd., Culpeper, Va.
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