Snow, Winds Leave 250K Mid-Atlantic Residents Without Power

View Comments
(Credit: Julie Denesha/Getty Images)

(Credit: Julie Denesha/Getty Images)

Latest News

LANHAM, Md. (CBSDC/AP) — A winter storm marched into the Mid-Atlantic region Wednesday, dumping nearly two feet of snow in some places and knocking out power to about 250,000 homes and businesses. It largely spared the nation’s capital, which was expecting much worse and had all but shut down.

The storm pummeled the nation’s midsection on Tuesday, killing at least four people in weather-related traffic accidents. It was forecast to head to the northeast on Thursday, bringing strong winds, more snow and the possibility of coastal flooding to New England.

In Washington, where as much as 10 inches were forecast, the storm did little but drop harmless snowflakes that rapidly melted amid warmer-than-expected temperatures.

“They just say that it might snow and the whole city shuts down,” said Sheri Sable, who was out walking her two dogs in light rain and marveled at how even the dog park she frequents failed to open at 7 a.m.

There were problems elsewhere in the region, though.

Lashing winds blew off part of the roof of a Stone Harbor, N.J., condominium complex and Ocean City officials advised residents to move their cars to higher ground in preparation of possible flooding. Maryland’s Bay Bridge, which connects Maryland’s Eastern shore with the Baltimore-Washington region, closed in both directions, because of wind gusts of up to 60 mph.

A tractor-trailer overturned on the bridge and leaned against the guardrail. Kelly Kiley, an interior designer, was driving on the span soon after the accident.

“The travel on the bridge was extremely scary,” Kiley said. “The crosswinds were terrible. Some of the taller box trucks were swaying.”

In Virginia, Gov. Bob McDonnell declared a state of emergency and about 50 National Guard soldiers were sent out to help clear roads.

“Over the next 12 hours, as the storm churns up the coast quite slowly, we expect a lot more heavy wet snow, we expect heavy winds and that is a dangerous situation,” he said about 1 p.m. “So stay off the roads, stay inside, enjoy the day off.”

More than 200,000 people in Virginia alone were without power and another 40,000 in New Jersey were in the dark. Hundreds of wrecks were reported around the region.

In Richmond, most commuters appeared to be headed home by midday with the exception of Clint Davis, an attorney who was needed in in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

“Unless they canceled court, I had to be here,” said Davis, who was wearing a hooded slicker over his suit to shield himself from gobs of snow blown from trees. “I’ll be here for two or three hours and come out to a snow-covered car.”

Up to 20 inches of snow piled up in parts of central and western Virginia. Some communities in Washington’s outer suburbs saw significant accumulation too, including in Loudoun County, which had 9 inches.

In Sterling, Va., a glaze of slush and snow coated major roads and side streets, but traffic was relatively light and plow trucks came through repeatedly. Many retailers were closed. Only a handful of customers patronized the Glory Days Grill. Carolyn Donahue was working from home and trekked out with her husband, Tom, for a lunch break without any trouble on slushy but passable roads.

“I don’t consider this a big storm,” he said.

Downtown Washington was unusually quiet. Officials eager to avoid a repeat of 2011 pre-emptively shut down federal offices and canceled public schools. The roughly 300,000 federal employees inside the Beltway and in surrounding counties were treated to a paid snow day.

“So far, knock on wood, we’ve dodged on this one,” said D.C. Homeland Security director Chris Geldart. “We’re keeping our fingers crossed that it remains the way it’s been.”

Some congressional hearings were postponed, but the House managed to approve legislation to prevent a government shutdown on March 27 and President Barack Obama was set to have dinner with GOP senators at hotel on Wednesday night.

The Baltimore-Washington area’s last major snowstorm struck Jan. 26, 2011. It hit Washington during the evening rush hour, causing some motorists to be stuck in traffic nearly overnight. It dropped 5 inches on Washington and 7.8 inches on Baltimore, knocked out power to about 320,000 homes and contributed to six deaths. The federal government later changed its policies to allow workers to leave their offices sooner or to work from home if major storms are expected.

There were at least four deaths. A semi-trailer slid off a snow-covered interstate in western Wisconsin, killing two people. A central Indiana woman died when a semi-trailer plowed into her car after she lost control merging onto the highway, and a man from Columbia City in northeast Indiana was killed when his snowmobile left the road, headed across a field and crashed into a wire fence.

The storm brought around 10 inches of snow to weather-hardened Chicago on Tuesday, closing schools and canceling more than 1,100 flights at the city’s two major airports.

Hundreds more flights were canceled Wednesday at Dulles and Reagan National airports in the Washington area, according to FlightAware.com.

In Pennsylvania and Ohio, many areas had 4 to 6 inches of snow. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for the Philadelphia area and parts of central Pennsylvania through Thursday morning.

Still recovering from Superstorm Sandy, the Jersey Shore prepared for another hit. The storm should bring rain and snow, but one of the biggest problems could be flooding in areas where dunes were washed away and many damaged homes still sit open and exposed.

As a mix of rain and wet, wind-driven snow continues to fall, utility companies throughout the D.C. metro region are still dealing with power outages.

As of 11 p.m. Wednesday, Dominion Power reported about 8,000 customers still in the dark and NOVEC was working to restore power to about 1,600.

POWER OUTAGES: Check outage maps in your area

Dominion Power said Tuesday it was sending extra crews to the western and northwestern parts of Virginia, where the storm was expected to deliver a foot or more of wet, heavy snow.

Pepco said it requested more than 300 mutual assistance crews for the storm restoration effort, including crews from as far as Alabama and Georgia.

BGE employees spent Tuesday at the company’s main warehouse in Baltimore loading trucks with storm kits, safety gear and electric restoration equipment needed for crews to restore power.

Your Severe Weather Photos

When severe weather hits your neighborhood, we want to see it.

Click the upload photos button and share your pics from Facebook, Flickr, Instagram or your computer. You can also tweet them to @WNEWNews and use the hashtag #WNEWweather.

Please be sure to send us your own, original photos, and please be sure that you’ve obtained permission from the people who appear in your photo to post on our site.

(TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,839 other followers