Junkies: How Does Super Bowl Saturday Sound?

View Comments
Ray Lewis holds up the Vince Lombardi Trophy after defeating the San Francisco 49ers during Super Bowl XLVII at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on Feb. 3, 2013 in New Orleans, La. The Ravens defeated the 49ers 34-31.  (Credit: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Ray Lewis holds up the Vince Lombardi Trophy after defeating the San Francisco 49ers during Super Bowl XLVII at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on Feb. 3, 2013 in New Orleans, La. The Ravens defeated the 49ers 34-31. (Credit: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Sports Junkies The Sports Junkies
Read More
More From The Sports Junkies

With the element of weather being added to next year’s Super Bowl – its host city being New York – the open air of MetLife Stadium could bring drastic change to an annual tradition.

The NFL is reportedly putting together a contingency plan, should a snowstorm or any sort of cold weather system move into East Rutherford, New Jersey in time to disrupt the NFL’s biggest game of the year, according to Yahoo!

“The average temperature in New Jersey/New York at that time is about 30 degrees and there is potential for a snow storm. There just always is,” said Lurch of the Junkies on 106.7 The Fan. “The NFL says now if they do have a snowstorm, they can move the Super Bowl up a couple days, or a day, or back a couple days, or a day.”

The NFL isn’t as concerned with a dusting of snow – something the New York area would be accustomed to handling – as much as it is with a weather crisis capable of shutting down the city, such as a nor’easter, Sports Business Daily is reporting.

“I’ve never been a fan of having it in the cold weather environment, unless it’s in a dome, and even then I think it stinks because we’ve been to Detroit for the Super Bowl,” Cakes said. “That was no picnic. That was no fun.”

“Let’s be honest, we all enjoy a nice snow game every once in a while,” E.B. added. “It’s kind of cool. It adds character to it. I remember when I used to play Madden I would sometimes go to the snow games because it looks cool. But it’s not about just those three hours. It’s about the host city having those people there for a week!”

Often fans who attend the Super Bowl turn the trip into a mini-vacation, traveling down to that year’s host city days in advance of the game to take in the sights and sounds. There’s also the media.

“It was 17 degrees on Super Bowl Sunday in New York this year,” EB complained. “So if it’s fifteen, seventeen, twenty degrees for a week while we’re all their in your city, trying to go out, support the economy, have fun, do our jobs at the same time, it makes it brutal!”

Obviously, there’s no telling what the future holds for New York weather a year from now, but it begs the question: Would you rather the Super Bowl be moved to Saturday or Monday?

“I think a lot of people would like Super Bowl Saturdays because Super Bowl Sunday usually wraps up around 10:30, 10:45,” J.P. said. “You’re up late.”

“What about Super Bowl Monday?” Lurch asked. “I think the NFL would rather have it on a Monday, wouldn’t they? They already own Monday nights with Monday Night Football. They don’t really own Saturdays.”

“But there’s going to be no parties or anything if it’s on a Monday,” Drab sharply responded. “I’d rather have it on a Saturday right now.”

Which would you prefer?

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,728 other followers