Biden: Gun Curbs Won’t End Mass Killings

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Denouncing Russia's actions in Crimea as nothing more than a "land grab," Vice President Joe Biden warned Russia on Tuesday that the U.S. and Europe will impose further sanctions as Moscow seeks to annex the Ukrainian territory. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Denouncing Russia’s actions in Crimea as nothing more than a “land grab,” Vice President Joe Biden warned Russia on Tuesday that the U.S. and Europe will impose further sanctions as Moscow seeks to annex the Ukrainian territory. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON — Curbing guns can’t ensure an end to mass slayings like December’s killings of 20 first-graders in Newtown, Conn., but it will reduce firearm deaths, Vice President Joe Biden said Thursday.

Biden said lawmakers can take steps “that have virtually zero impact on your Second Amendment right to own a weapon for both self-defense and recreation but can save some lives.” Doing that, he said, “seems to be a no-brainer.”

Biden spoke to reporters after meeting privately with Senate Democrats to urge them to back President Barack Obama’s proposals to restrict gun violence. Obama’s plan includes bans on assault weapons and on high-capacity magazines for ammunition and requiring all gun buyers to undergo background checks.

“I’m not saying there’s an absolute consensus on all these things,” he said. Citing the wide-spread horror over the Newtown shootings, he said, “But there is a sea change. A sea change in the attitudes of the American people,” who he said “will not understand if we don’t act.”

The Senate Judiciary Committee held Congress’ first 2013 hearing on gun control on Wednesday as lawmakers begin focusing on what restrictions they will try enacting this year. Already, it has become clear that parts of Obama’s plan will face difficulties, especially barring assault weapons and ammunition magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds.

Asked earlier Thursday about the prospects for passage of various parts of Obama’s plans, No. 2 Senate Democratic leader Richard Durbin of Illinois cited strong support for broadening the requirement for background checks and doing more to prevent mentally unstable people from obtaining guns. He said the assault weapons ban, which he supports, “is probably the toughest part of this conversation.”

Besides opposition from many Republicans, the proposals have prompted hesitancy from some Democrats seeking re-election next year in Republican-leaning states.

“I’m a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, and I want to see a balanced approach,” said Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., who faces re-election in 2014. “And I’ll take each amendment and bill as it comes.”

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, predicted that the Republican-run House would never pass an assault weapons ban, no matter what the Democratic-led Senate does.

“Most of us Republicans believe these gun-control approaches don’t work, and yet they diminish liberty,” he said.

Obama’s plan was based on suggestions developed by a task force on gun violence headed by Biden.

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(© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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