King: Boehner, Republicans ‘Have Written Me Off’ After Scrapping Sandy Aid Bill

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Rep. Peter King, chairman of the sub-committee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence, once again suggested the 9/11 terror attacks are directly linked to current Middle East unrest, saying that “ISIS is more of a threat to the United States now than Al-Qaeda was prior to September 11.”  (credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Rep. Peter King, chairman of the sub-committee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence, once again suggested the 9/11 terror attacks are directly linked to current Middle East unrest, saying that “ISIS is more of a threat to the United States now than Al-Qaeda was prior to September 11.” (credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON (CBS/AP) — New York lawmakers from both parties on Wednesday lashed out at the decision by House GOP leaders not to hold a vote on Hurricane Sandy aid in the current Congress, calling it a “betrayal.”

Reps. Michael Grimm, a Republican, and Jerrold Nadler, a Democrat, said in angry House floor remarks that while they did not agree on much, House Speaker John Boehner’s decision would be a crushing blow to states battered by the late October storm.

“There was a betrayal,” said Grimm.

The Senate approved a $60.4 billion measure Friday to help with recovery from the storm that devastated parts of New York, New Jersey and nearby states. The House Appropriations Committee has drafted a smaller, $27 billion measure, and a vote had been expected before Congress’ term ends Thursday at noon. An amendment for $33 billion in additional aid, partly to protect against future storms, was also being considered.

Grimm and Nadler were among several New York and New Jersey lawmakers who took to the House floor to complain about Boehner’s move. The lawmakers said Boehner pulled the bill without talking to them.

“It’s the most disgraceful action I’ve seen in this House,” said Nadler. “It is a betrayal by the speaker personally of the members of this House,” Nadler said.

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., called it a “cruel knife in the back” to New and New Jersey. He said some Republicans have a double standard when it comes to providing aid to New York and New Jersey compared with other regions of the country suffering disasters. Somehow, he said, money going to New York and New Jersey is seen as “corrupt.”

He said those same Republicans have no trouble coming to New York and New Jersey to raise millions of dollars. King urged donors from the two states not to give money to Republicans who are ignoring their needs on Sandy.

“I’m saying anyone from New York or New Jersey who contributes one penny to the Republican Congressional Campaign Committee should have their head examined,” King told CNN. “I would not give one penny to these people based on what they did to us last night.”

King said Congress approved $60 billion for Hurricane Katrina in 2005 within 10 days, but hasn’t appropriated any money for Sandy in over two months.

“They are writing off new York, they’re writing off New Jersey, well they have written me off and they will have a hard time getting my vote,” King told CNN, adding that Republicans are wondering why they are becoming a minority party.

Rep. Frank Pallone Jr., D-N.J., blamed Tea Party lawmakers and conservatives who were reluctant to approve new spending soon after the debate over the “fiscal cliff” budget issues for the sudden move by GOP leaders. He said the move was “deplorable.”

New York and New Jersey lawmakers said they believed they had support for both measures.

“I am convinced it would have passed,” said Rep. Frank LoBiiondo, R-N.J., who represents Atlantic City which was hard hit

LoBiondo said New York and New Jersey lawmakers have backed past disaster aid bills for other states.

“Now when it comes to us, we have a lot of hemming and hawing,” LoBiondo said.

President Barack Obama is calling for House Republicans to vote Wednesday on Hurricane Sandy aid “without delay for our fellow Americans.”

Obama says in a written statement that many people in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are trying to recover from the storm and need “immediate support with the bulk of winter still in front of us.”

The lawmakers had erupted in anger late Tuesday night after learning the House Republican leadership decided to allow the current term of Congress to end without holding a vote on aid for victims of Hurricane Sandy.

King said Tuesday night he was told by the office of Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia that Boehner had decided to abandon a vote this session.

Cantor, who sets the House schedule, did not immediately comment. New York and New Jersey GOP lawmakers were hoping to meet with Cantor and Boehner on Wednesday.

House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer of Maryland told reporters that just before Tuesday evening’s vote on “fiscal cliff” legislation, Cantor told him that he was “99.9 percent confident that this bill would be on the floor, and that’s what he wanted.”

A spokesman for Boehner, Michael Steel on Wednesday would not say whether Boehner would reconsider his decision on Sandy aid, responding with the same statement he issued on Tuesday night: “The speaker is committed to getting this bill passed this month.”

More than $2 billion in federal funds has been spent so far on relief efforts for 11 states and the District of Columbia struck by the storm, one of the worst ever to hit the Northeast. The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster relief fund still has about $4.3 billion, enough to pay for recovery efforts into early spring, according to officials. The unspent FEMA money can only be used for emergency services, said Pallone.

New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, New Hampshire, Delaware, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts are receiving federal aid.

Sandy was blamed for at least 120 deaths and battered coastline areas from North Carolina to Maine. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut were the hardest hit states and suffered high winds, flooding and storm surges. The storm damaged or destroyed more than 72,000 homes and businesses in New Jersey. In New York, 305,000 housing units were damaged or destroyed and more than 265,000 businesses were affected.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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