106.7 The Fan All News 99.1 WNEW CBS Sports Radio 1580

Axelrod: ‘More Equitable’ To Raise Taxes On Wealthier Americans

View Comments
Democratic political consultant David Axelrod speaks to members of the media at Hofstra University after the second presidential debate on Oct. 16, 2012 in Hempstead, N.Y. (credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Democratic political consultant David Axelrod speaks to members of the media at Hofstra University after the second presidential debate on Oct. 16, 2012 in Hempstead, N.Y. (credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Latest News
D.C. | Md. | Va. | Sports 
 

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) — President Barack Obama’s senior campaign adviser says it’s “more equitable” for the wealthier Americans to pay higher taxes in order to avoid the “fiscal cliff.”

Speaking to CBS News’ “Face the Nation,” David Axelrod reiterated the president’s stance that Americans making $250,000 and above have to pay their fair share.

“The President believes it’s more equitable to get that from the wealthiest Americans who have done very well and, frankly, don’t need those tax cuts, and who benefited disproportionately from the tax cuts in the past decade. And most Americans agree with that,” Axelrod told CBS News.

Axelrod added that he is encouraged that House Speaker John Boehner will work with Obama to get a deal done.

“I think that the Speaker’s comments have been encouraging and, obviously, there’s money to be gained by closing some of these loopholes and applying them to deficit reduction, so I think there are a lot of ways to skin this cat so long as everybody comes with a positive, constructive attitude toward the task,” Axelrod explained to CBS News.

Boehner insisted on Friday that any deal with Obama to avert the so-called fiscal cliff must include lower tax rates, eliminating special interest loopholes and reining in government-benefit programs.

“2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform,” Boehner said.

Boehner and Obama have taken the initial steps in high-stakes negotiations over how to deal with expiring Bush-era tax cuts and automatic spending cuts to defense and domestic programs that economists warn could plunge the nation into another recession.

Boehner, Obama and Senate leaders face a Jan. 2 deadline to reach an agreement or at least come up with a framework to deal with the issue early next year.

Boehner expressed a degree of optimism about resolving the issues and ensuring that his sometimes reluctant GOP rank and file will back any deal.

“When the president and I have come to an agreement, there’s been no problem getting it passed in the House,” Boehner said.

The speaker declined to discuss specifics on deficit targets or what tax loopholes to eliminate though he cited both corporate and individual.

“I don’t want to box myself in. I don’t want to box anyone else in,” he said.

Boehner indicated that increasing the nation’s borrowing authority, which was a divisive issue in August 2011 talks, should be part of any talks in the coming weeks on avoiding the fiscal cliff. The government has said the nation won’t reach the debt limit until the spring.

“It’s an issue that’s going to have to be addressed, sooner rather than later,” he said.

Boehner said he had a brief, cordial conversation with Obama earlier in the week and reiterated that the president needs to lead on the negotiations.

Democrats have resisted including entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security in any deficit-cutting deal. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said earlier this week they were unwilling to make changes in Social Security.

Boehner insisted that the programs need to be on the table.

“It’s not like there is money in Social Security and Medicare” trust fund, Boehner said. “This has to be dealt with.”

The Ohio Republican, reflecting the sentiment of his caucus, said increasing the maximum 35 percent tax rate on high-income earners cannot be part of the deal. Boehner did signal that he was open to eliminating loopholes.

“The problem with raising tax rates on wealthy Americans is that more than half of them are small business owners,” Boehner said. “Raising tax rates will slow down our ability to create the jobs that everyone says they want.”

Obama has invited leaders from Congress to the White House this week in hopes to work on a deal.

(TM and © Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus