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Mike Wise: Boras Agrees Shutting Down Strasburg Is The Right Move

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Stephen Strasburg’s agent isn’t kicking up dust about the Washington Nationals’ decision to shut the young fireballer down this season.

Scott Boras wants to err on the side of the caution when it comes to his client’s long-term health following Tommy John surgery.

Doctor’s protocol following the procedure called for Strasburg to pitch a very limited number of innings in 2011. He was then prescribed rehab during the offseason in advance of a 2012 season with another innings limit. Their plan accounted for a start every five days, with a certain number of pitches each game. 

Surgeons say it is best to continue with the formula in 2013, again with an increased innings limit.

“Following the injury, we’ve exchanged a great deal of information,” Boras told Mike Wise on 106.7 The Fan Thursday morning. “We have a sports fitness institute.  Stephen has worked out at our institute. Plus, consultation from Dr. [Lewis] Yocum.”

There are plenty who think it’s ludicrous to bench a pitcher with a 14-5 record while his team in the thick of the playoff hunt. But Strasburg is a long-term investment for the Nationals.

The risks associated with not following Dr. Yocum’s rehabilitation plan are great and any deviation could be met with catastrophic results.

Boras cited former client Steve Avery as a perfect example of what could happen to Strasburg.

Avery pitched over 700 innings, including the postseason, during his first three seasons in the majors. His career entered a rapid decline when he was just 24-years-old and was virtually done at 28.

And Avery was a relatively healthy pitcher. Unlike Strasburg, he was simply overworked.

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