106.7 The Fan All News 99.1 WNEW CBS Sports Radio 1580

Obama Campaign: Romney’s Fundraising ‘Could Cost Us The Election’

View Comments
President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally at Dobbins Elementary School in Poland, Ohio, on July 6, 2012, while on a bus tour of Ohio and Pennsylvania. (credit: JIM WATSON/AFP/GettyImages)

President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally at Dobbins Elementary School in Poland, Ohio, on July 6, 2012, while on a bus tour of Ohio and Pennsylvania. (credit: JIM WATSON/AFP/GettyImages)

Latest News

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

WASHINGTON (CBSDC/AP) — President Obama’s re-election team is reaching out to potential donors after presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney raised more than $100 million in June.

I an email titled “Urgent,” campaign manager Jim Messina warns donors that Romney’s fundraising could cost Obama the election.

“We’re still tallying our own numbers, but this means their gap is getting wider, and if it continues at this pace, it could cost us the election,” Messina said in the email.

Messina added that the $100 million raised by Romney was more than what Obama raised in April and May combined.

“If we don’t take this seriously now, we risk finding ourselves at a point where there is too much ground to make up,” Messina said.

Romney, while enjoying a financial bounty with money raised directly for his campaign and the RNC, was also getting help from outside “super” political committees working in his favor. Taken together, the groups’ fundraising strength means Romney could have a permanent financial advantage over Obama, who could be the first president in history to be outspent by his opponent.

The totals showed Romney picking up the pace after working in April and May to bring Republicans together following a bruising battle for the Republican nomination. The campaign in concert with the RNC had set $100 million fundraising goals for June and July, and appeared to have met the first.

Obama and Romney have raised more than $350 million combined toward the election — a pace expected to exceed $1 billion by November. That’s factoring in hundreds of millions in expected contributions to political parties, joint-fundraising efforts, super PACs and nonprofit organizations.

Romney officials have privately said the governor’s national committee was on track to raise $150 million in a period spanning roughly April through June. Those officials told donors there were few states that haven’t broken internal fundraising records, and they expressed confidence the campaign could close its cash-on-hand gap with Obama’s re-election effort.

Meanwhile, a joint-fundraising committee with the GOP, known as the Romney Victory Fund, has hosted more than 100 events so far, including a Boston fundraiser on May 24 that pulled in $7 million. Romney starting raising money with the Republican Party in April.

Obama himself broke fundraising records four years ago, pulling in $750 million for his last campaign, including a record $150 million in September 2008. To be sure, Obama also has super PACs working in his favor — notably Priorities USA Action, run by a former White House aide — although the groups have yet to catch up to the fundraising benchmarks of their GOP counterparts.

Pro-Romney super PACs like American Crossroads and Restore Our Future have spent tens of millions of dollars on TV ads critical of Obama in key states, and the groups expect to spend more as November approaches.

The Obama campaign has spent nearly $71 million on advertising from April through last week, part of an overall $90 million effort by Democrats on the presidential race, according to ad-spending reports provided to The Associated Press. Romney’s campaign has spent far less, $15.6 million, with super PACs making up the rest of the roughly $68 million for Republicans.

Obama leads narrowly in a number of closely targeted battleground and swing states. But Romney has crept closer to the Democrat in national head-to-head polls since essentially locking up the nomination in April.

Neither Obama nor the Democratic National Committee has released what they raised in June. However, it’s expected that they will not report having raised $100 million.

In May, Romney and the RNC raised a combined $76.8 million, while Obama and the DNC brought in $60 million. A full accounting of the campaigns’ finances is due to the Federal Election Commission by July 20.

Romney’s campaign declined to verify the total, which was confirmed by Republican officials who asked not to be named because they were not authorized to release the information. Campaign officials said they planned to release their fundraising totals for June next week. Politico first reported the figure.

Obama spokesman Ben LaBolt said Romney was leaking the figure to distract from other issues.

“Americans are less concerned about how much money he raised to get himself elected and more interested in what he would do after repealing health reform,” LaBolt said. He was referring to Romney’s pledge to repeal the health care law enacted by Obama in 2010, which the Supreme Court upheld last week.

(TM and © Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,561 other followers