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Man Who Helped U.S. Find Bin Laden Awarded Federal Bonus

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One of the people awarded a federal bonus for service was the man who helped lead Navy Seals toward Osama bin Laden's compound in May 2011. (credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

One of the people awarded a federal bonus for service was the man who helped lead Navy Seals toward Osama bin Laden’s compound in May 2011. (credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON (CBSDC) – Among the group of government workers who received $439 million in 2011 federal bonuses, one of the recipients of a bonus included the man who helped lead the Navy Seals toward Osama bin Laden.

A recent WUSA9 investigation has indicated that the list includes senior government officials, as well as a group of federal workers that have been awarded with the top financial award for service that the president can give out. The man who helped lead the Navy Seals to bin Laden in May 2011 built a model of the bin Laden compound down to every last detail, using satellite imagery interpretation and intelligence to help track bin Laden. The bonus is said to have been one-third of his annual salary, as much as a $63,000 one-time bonus, Senior Executives Association spokeswoman Carol Bonosaro told WUSA9

“That enabled us to pinpoint, find, and conduct the raid on Osama bin Laden, which is rather amazing,” Bonosaro said about the bonus winner’s actions. The person’s name was not released. “I think it’s unfortunate that the American people don’t know what they do.”

The news comes during a time when the program, established in 1978, has been limited during the Obama Administration to the lowest total of money-per-award number in the program’s history. Other past winners have included developers of nuclear and biological censors, emergency rescuers during the Haitian earthquake relief effort, and workers who protected endangered species during the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

The program costs about $3 million, but the savings make it a tremendously worthwhile initiative to keep going.

“I think that’s a very good return on the investment,” Bonosaro told WUSA9. “They’ve just done amazing things. They’ve done it on behalf of the government and the American people.”

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