Poll: Romney Better Equipped At Improving Economy Than Obama

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Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks to supporters during a campaign stop on April 18, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C. (credit: Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images)

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks to supporters during a campaign stop on April 18, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C. (credit: Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON (CBSDC) — A new national poll finds that registered voters feel GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney is better equipped to handle and improve the economy than President Obama.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday shows that a majority of voters surveyed disapprove of the way the president is handling the economy, 56 to 38 percent.

The poll finds that voters believe Romney is better to handle the economy than Obama at 47 to 43 percent. Registered voters polled also say that the presumptive GOP nominee is better equipped at creating jobs, 45 to 42 percent, and his administration would do a better job at lowering gas prices at 44 to 31 percent.

“Romney seems to hold an edge on the economy – the top issue of the campaign – and holds his own against the incumbent on being a strong leader,” Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, said in the release. Sixty-one percent of those polled say Romney has strong leadership qualities, compared to 60 percent for Obama.

The poll also shows that 49 percent of those surveyed have an unfavorable opinion of Obama, compared to 45 percent of those who have a favorable opinion. Thirty-eight percent of those surveyed have an unfavorable view of Romney as 33 percent say they have a favorable opinion of him.

The Quinnipiac poll has Obama with a slight lead of 46 to 42 percent over Romney.

“The presidential race remains tight,” Brown said in the statement. “With Gov. Mitt Romney now the de facto Republican nominee, a look at how the two men are perceived by the electorate reflects much of the historic differences between the two parties in close elections, which this seems likely to be.”

Quinnipiac University surveyed 2,577 registered voters.

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