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National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day For DEA

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are blasting the Food and Drug Administration for secretly monitoring the emails of agency scientists who went public with allegations that they were pressured to approve certain medical devices.

In a report published Tuesday, House Republicans say the FDA's computer surveillance may have overstepped federal laws designed to protect government whistleblowers. Using software that took rapid fire screen shots of employees' computers, the FDA picked up emails from the five whistleblowers to members of Congress. Such communications are protected under federal law.

House Democrats defended the surveillance at a hearing Tuesday morning, pointing to the findings of the inspector general that oversees the FDA. In a report released ahead of the hearing, the inspector concludes that the surveillance was "reasonable" because the employees were leaking confidential information to the press. Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are blasting the Food and Drug Administration for secretly monitoring the emails of agency scientists who went public with allegations that they were pressured to approve certain medical devices.

In a report published Tuesday, House Republicans say the FDA’s computer surveillance may have overstepped federal laws designed to protect government whistleblowers. Using software that took rapid fire screen shots of employees’ computers, the FDA picked up emails from the five whistleblowers to members of Congress. Such communications are protected under federal law.

House Democrats defended the surveillance at a hearing Tuesday morning, pointing to the findings of the inspector general that oversees the FDA. In a report released ahead of the hearing, the inspector concludes that the surveillance was “reasonable” because the employees were leaking confidential information to the press. Credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

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WASHINGTON (CBSDC) - If you have expired or unused prescription drugs in your home that you don’t know what to do with, you can drop them off at sites nationwide.

For the fourth time in two years, the Drug Enforcement Administration will hold a National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day.

The program disposes of medication at over 5,300 sites operated by over 4,000 state and local law enforcement agencies. It has disposed of almost 500 tons of medication so far.

Prescription drugs are abused by more Americans than those that use cocaine, hallucinogens and heroin put together, says the National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

The program was initially set up by the DEA to prevent old medicine from falling into unauthorized hands as well as to keep it from being thrown away and seeping into water supplies.

You can find a nearby collection site here.

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