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3 Humble School Workers Split Mega Millions Win

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credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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BALTIMORE (CBSDC/AP) — Two public school teachers and a school administrator are sharing the spoils of last month’s record Mega Millions jackpot, planning trips to Europe, new homes and a daughter’s college education, Maryland Lottery officials said Tuesday.

The Maryland winners claimed their proceeds Monday and chose to remain anonymous, but the lottery agency shared some details in a news conference, including the fact that each of the three works other jobs outside school to make ends meet.

“If it can’t be you, these people are precisely the people you would want to see win,” Maryland Lottery director Stephen Martino said.

The winning Maryland ticket is one of three nationally that split the $656 million jackpot, the biggest in Mega Millions history. The other winners in the March 30 drawing were picked in Kansas and Illinois. Kansas’ winner claimed a share of the jackpot Friday, but also decided to remain anonymous. Nobody has come forward in Illinois.

Martino said the Maryland winners bought 60 tickets in three locations as a pool. The winning ticket came from a 7-Eleven store in Milford Mill outside Baltimore.

Each of the three will receive a lump sum payment of $35 million after taxes.

The two women and one man work in public education in the state. Officials did not disclose where, and said they knew each other from work but were not all at the same school.

One woman is in her 20s, one in her 50s and the man is in his 40s

One winner is a special education teacher, one is an elementary school teacher and the third is a school administrator.

Their plans include backpacking in Europe, a tour of Italy’s wine country and paying for a daughter’s college education.

All three also planned to buy new homes and invest, officials said.

“I think that everything that was on their list, whether it was paying tuition for their children, or purchasing a home or taking a trip somewhere is not the kind of ostentatious brandishing of this money that would necessarily bring them a lot of attention.”

(TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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